McCance Steel

This Belfast photographer may be starting to find a sub sector in photography that he doesn’t mind loosing track of time.  Factories and the like are pretty cool places for a photographer to hang out, well I like them.  Initially when you walk in they feel dark, dirty and gloomy but once you start walking around and taking some test shots they can yield some pretty cool content.  Theres a but.  You have to want to be there.  As with the vast majority of jobs I complete, I enjoy most of them.  If you enjoy most of the things you work at, generally speaking you get good results.  The opposite is true.  If you hate something, its usually the case that you get rubbish results.  Anyway, the steel factory!

Before I go on, it should be noted that I blog because I like too.  I blog posts and pictures like what you see on this site because I love the content.  I am not posting my work here in the hope that you will like it and hire me.  No one should pander to the needs of others.  Do what makes you happy!

I was put in contact with the guys down at McCance steel via the web company that were looking after them.  If you need a website I can not recommend the team over at 3 Sixty Create highly enough.

As with a lot of jobs that I do for my clients there is no brief, or if there is it’s pretty wishy-washy.  This job fell in to the latter category.  I always prefer a brief as it helps minimise misunderstandings and can help optimise time on site. I bill my clients hourly so I need to make sure I use the time efficiently.  The guys showed me around their factory.  It was pretty sizeable but it became quickly evident after looking around that there were several areas I had to focus on.

I might get the next bit wrong, but as I seen it here’s the different areas.  Lengths of box steel/sheets were brought in to the factory on lorry.  The steel is then unloaded to the relevant area in the factory depending on its size and type.  The lengths of steel would then be moved around the factory to the different cutting/rolling machines.  Once at these machines the steel would be cut/rolled down to the customers specific requirements then finally it would leave the factory either via the customers own lorry or the McCance Steel lorry.

In short, steel comes in, steel gets cut, steel goes out.

I had to keep the kit I was using to a minimum.  Like the previous couple of jobs completed in factories there’s often a lot of things moving around and I dont want kit getting damaged because I left it somewhere stupid.  Two cameras with speed lights attached would be supplemented with two off camera speed lights.  I am so thankful during shoots like this that I dont need to find power plugs for lights.  Yes the speed lights aren’t as powerful as studio heads but the compactness more than makes up for it.  Anyway I can just crank up the ISO on the DSLR’s to make up the shortfall in power from the speed lights, the ISO control on my D750’s are that good.

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